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If I had a brain… Practice the second conditional: A2-B1
Ian Kime
January 25, 2021

If I had a brain… Practice the second conditional: A2-B1

Don’t feel like reading? Watch the tutorial instead.

Our goal here at ESL Expertz is to save you time and energy, and in this age of online learning, many of us have had to find new resources adapted for our new tools. To that end, we are redesigning our favorite resources to best help our teachers.

Here we propose a simple, fun and aesthetic tool to practice the second conditional with your students that takes no effort on your part. It works your students’ speaking and writing skills with separate response and production section.

This resource is meant as a revision or can be used in the free practice section of your lesson. The downloadable ZIP contains a PDF (if you still have in-person lessons) and JPG files (to use with your preferred screen-sharing tool).

How to use each page…

if i had a brain page 1 esl expertz

The first page is the simplest, therefore it is meant to be used first. Here are a few examples:

  • Have each student respond in turn by completing a phrase linking the red bubble with a blue proposition.
  • Have one student respond by completing a phrase linking the red bubble with a blue proposition. Then, the next student must use the end of their phrase to create a new second conditional statement, then the next, and so on.
  • Work backwards. Ask a student to create a result using would/could/might (I could build a house…). Then, have the other students create the condition by connecting the red bubble and a blue propisiton. Together, they create a complete phrase. For example – Student A: I could build a house… Student B: …if I had a hammer. Let your students justify their answers if they need to!

 

The second page uses the negative form (which I find students shy away from more often than not), and a constraint (a smartphone). It will be more difficult for your students to create their phrases, and they will have to use more of their language knowledge, therefore, we recommend this page comes second. Here are some examples:

  • Have each student respond in turn by completing a phrase linking the red bubble with a blue proposition.
  • Have one student respond by completing a phrase linking the red bubble with a blue proposition. Then, the next student must use the end of their phrase to create a new second conditional statement, then the next, and so on.
  • Work backwards. Ask a student to create a result using a blue proposition and would/could/might (my friends would never see me…). Then, have the other students create the condition by replacing “smartphone” in the red bubble. Together, they create a complete phrase. For example – Student A: My friends would never see me… Student B: …if I didn’t have a car. Let your students justify their answers if they need to!

 

The third page offers loads of possibilities for production and creativity during online lessons. Here are a few examples:

  • Have a student use the whiteboard tools (or if that is unavailable, they can send their proposition to you in the chat) to create their own partial condition like on page 1. For example: If I were… If I knew… If I could… etc. Next, ask your students to create their own propositions that fit the condition in blue. For example: …taller… …karate… …swim…
    Now, your students can play their own version of page 1 that they created themselves!
  • Have a student use the whiteboard tools (or if that is unavailable, they can send their proposition to you in the chat) to create their own full condition like on page 2. For example: If aliens came tomorrow… If dogs could talk… If I got a raise… Next, ask your students to create their own propositions for subjects in the result phrase. For example: …my mom… …my cat… …the president of the United States… etc. Now, your students can play their own version of page 2 that they created themselves!

Responding to static text isn’t always very creative. Students love to create their own games in class, I can attest to that. It also helps them with their spelling, typing, and writing while showing you any glaring gaps in their comprehension.

This resource was created by teachers who teach online for teachers who teach online. I am using this resource all week as a small review with my groups. It’s so easy to use and exploits plenty of teaching time efficiently.

Let us know how it goes 🙂

Ian Kime

Ian Kime

I have been teaching English abroad since receiving my CELTA certificate in Poland in 2018. I enjoy tracking my individual students’ development but love having lessons with big groups! Now that I teach online, I am accompanied by my sidekicks Olaf, Mała, Pirate and Bandit on a regular basis.

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  1. Si j’avais une cervelle – pratiquer le conditionnel en FLE | Les Zexperts FLE - […] Note : pour vos cours d’anglais, retrouvez ce post  en version ESL. […]

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